‘Alala aka The Hawaiian Crow

Crows of any sort aren’t typically my thing, but because my co-author spent quite a bit of time in Hawaii, this post is pretty near and dear to her. As with anything, if something is extinct or nearing extinction there’s a pretty clear problem. Getting to the root of that problem can sometimes be a little challenging, but well worth it, IMO.

…because there are no living ‘alala in the wild these birds have been reproduced in captivity. Upon being released into the wild, researchers are learning of many difficulties that these little guys have been facing. Some aren’t finding proper mates and others aren’t feeding their babies properly.

Crows on the mainland are a large part of the literary world. They can symbolize death, mystery, and magic. Have any of you had any experience with wildlife conservation in any capacity? I’ve been lucky enough to befriend two conservationists. I believe that they are invaluable to the sustainability of our little winged friends and hope that you do, too!

For more information on them here’s a quick excerpt from the San Diego ZooContinue reading “‘Alala aka The Hawaiian Crow”

Vaquita

It’s super rare for me to sit and scroll through the channel guide on my TV, but when it happens, I often find myself watching one of two channels: History or Smithsonian. So, it really didn’t seem strange for me to select a marine animal to highlight for this post. As crazy animal lovers, my c0-author and I decided we’d do our best to shed light on some animals that are close to extinction. Today we talk about the vaquita. I bet many have never heard of it, seen it, or cared enough to look it up. (…and honestly, you aren’t alone.)

This little dude is found in the Gulf of California – pretty close to where some of you live, I’ll bet. He’s in the porpoise family but is so small at birth that he gets caught in fisherman’s nets and rarely survives. While this is just one of many porpoises that are being caught in the nets, it does point to a larger issue. As the human population grows so does the demand for food. Many times we are not sourcing wildlife responsibly and the sustainability of these precious animals is lacking.

…you would think more could be done to ensure the safety of the vaquita since they are practically the dolphins little cousin. If you want to know more about these guys, please check out this short video on Saving the Desert Porpoise.

What are your thoughts on the many marine animals that are being trapped and killed in these nets?

Northern White Rhino

Sudan, the world's last remaining male northern white rhino, has joined Tinder in a bid to successfully breed and save the species.This is Sudan. Currently he is the last, surviving great northern rhino in the world. As far back as 1919, there were two to three thousand great northern rhinos in the wild. By 1989, there were only 15 left in the wild and by 2007, 0. Why, you ask? Extensive poaching of course.

When conservationists realized what was happening, they began to pull the wild rhinos and bring them to captivity in the hopes of starting a breeding program to repopulate the dying population. Captivity didn’t work so well for these big beasties. For one reason or another, their survivability rate continue to plummet in captivity. It was decided that the last few great northern rhinos would be transferred back to the wild, where, naturally, they thrive better and have round the clock, 365 day, armed protection from puny poachers.

Sudan and his species plight has garnered more attention as of late because the Ol Pejeta Conservancy has started a Tinder profile for this handsome specimen of rhino in order to raise donation money to be able to perform in vitro fertilization. So far its been a real hit, but they have a long way to go.

(Picture credit: CNN)