Northern Hairy-Nosed Wombat

The species being discussed today hails all the way from Australia! I originally was going to write about a different animal but then I saw a Facebook video this morning about an animal sanctuary that featured some endemic, endangered animals like the Tasmanian devil and realized the wombat would be cooler to talk about. There are three main types of wombats. The common wombat, the northern hairy-nosed wombat and the southern hairy-nosed wombat. The common wombat occupies coastal areas while the northern and southern wombats prefer much a much drier habitat so are found inland. Northern hairy-nosed wombats are the biggest of the three species weighing in at about 32 kg (70 lbs) while the southern hairy-nosed wombat weighs the least amount; 26 kg (57 lbs). They have a bit of a stocky build with large paws and claws that allow them to build burrows that they stay in most of the time. When they walk, their bodies kind of sway from side to side because of their bulk but they are quite fast; averaging about 40 km/hr (about 24 mph) over short distances.

Painted Hunting Dog

Today’s endangered animal comes to you from southern Africa; specifically northern Botswana, western Zimbabwe, eastern Namibia and western Zambia. The species goes by many names: Painted Hunting dog, African wild dog or the Cape Hunting Dog.

The name Painted Hunting dog is derived from the splotchy markings on the dog’s coat. Each dog has its own unique markings that other pack members are able to identify. African wild dogs grow to be about 30 inches tall (which is a little over 2 feet), be about 30-56 inches long (2 feet-5 feet) and will weigh about 40 to 70 pounds as adults. Their preferred habitat is low grassy areas such as savannas, semi-desert areas or upland forests. African wild dogs are highly social individuals. Pack sizes can average about 10 to 40 or more individuals. Their primary prey are gazelles and antelopes such as the Impala, Greater Kudu and Thomson’s Gazelle. However, they have been known to take down larger prey such as wildebeest and African buffalo. If food is scarce, they’ll go for smaller prey such as hares, lizards and eggs but that’s a very small diet in comparison to what they normally eat. Painted hunting dogs can reach run speeds up to 45 mph.

Albany Adder

Don’t freak out but snakes are important too! Today’s endangered species is one of the most endangered reptiles in the world; the Albany adder. The picture makes the snake look huge but most Albany adders are 12 inches or less in length. There is not too much about this species so this post is sadly, going to be a little short.

Vaquita Revisited

Today’s endangered animal has been discussed on RT in the past. In fact, it was one of the first 5 posts when this series was started. I would like to revisit the species today to shed some more detail on this unique creature dubbed “the panda of the sea” because I came across an article that just makes me so sad for it.

Mexican Long-Nosed Bat

In the spirit of Halloween passed, today’s endangered animal is the Mexican long-nosed bat or Leptonycteris nivalis. For starters, not much is known about the range of this species. The Mexican long-nosed bat is reported to be seen in the states of Arizona, New Mexico and Texas as well as Mexico and Guatemala. The reason the range is not specifically known is because scientists have not been able to pinpoint the migratory pattern of the species. Population size of roosts can range from zero to 10,000 individuals in a single year but it is suspected that the overall general population of the species is definitely declining. Fun fact: When you think of a flying creature, it’s usually a bird however, bats are the only mammals that can fly.

Monkey Puzzle Tree

Today’s endangered species comes from Chile. It’s called the Monkey Puzzle Tree. It’s also known as the Pehuén, monkey tail tree, Chilean pine and Pino Araucana. Comes from the Family Aracucariaceae (don’t ask me how to pronounce that one) which is species of evergreen conifers but it’s not actually the same as your average pine tree. The name came from the idea that it would be a real puzzle if a monkey tried to climb this tree but, fun fact, there are no monkeys in Chile anyway!